Voodoo Donuts

Portland

I was in Vancouver, WA for a work conference and hackathon, which the team did quite well in. The Vancouver office has all the comforting trappings of suburbia within one block: a Whole Foods, Target, Chipotle.

We explored Portland again. We compared several local donut shops, all delicious. We biked along the waterfront and along the Tilikum Crossing bridge. We sat at Poet’s Beach. We wandered through Powell’s Books, the largest bookstore I’ve ever seen. We rode the aerial tram to the top of a hill.

Aerial tram
Aerial tram

We ambled through the Japanese garden and the rose garden. J ran down a grassy hill. Unbeknown to him, there was deep mud, and he got covered from his shoes to his neck.

Japanese garden
Japanese garden
Rose garden
Rose garden

We went to Mt. St. Helens, and the winding mountain road was a true joy for me to drive. Everything flowed effortlessly from mind to steering wheel to pavement. We took a break at the Forest Learning Center. The force of the 1980 eruption generated shock waves that shattered tree trunks. There was a mad dash by logging companies to salvage as much wood as possible.

Mt. St. Helens
Mt. St. Helens

Next we visited the Johnston Observatory, named after the geologist who was a proponent of keeping the mountain closed to keep the public safe in the days leading up to the eruption. He was caught in the blast, and his famous last words were “Vancouver! Vancouver! This is it!” We entered an auditorium to watch a video about the eruption. In front of us was a vibrant red curtain. A projector screen descended in front of the curtain, and the movie began playing, with its dated transitions and double-vision effects. There were a number of point of view shots of tumbling down the mountain, as though we, the audience, were a landslide. At the conclusion of the video, the curtains lifted, and through the floor-to-ceiling window, we beheld the grandeur of Mt. St. Helens with half its face blown off. We braved the sun and 90+ degree temperatures for as long as we could, hiking along the Boundary Trail. The path was completely exposed, just dust, wildflowers, and the towering volcano.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *