Copenhagen

Copenhagen alleyway

J and I went to Copenhagen. Like other European capitals, Copenhagen is full of brick castles and historic buildings. Fire played a large role in the architecture of Copenhagen. There were two great fires in the 1700s, and both destroyed most of the city.

Christiansborg Palace, home of the Danish Parliament
Christiansborg Palace, home of the Danish Parliament

As we walked around the city, we learned a lot of interesting facts. For example, Bluetooth is named after the Danish king Harald Bluetooth. The symbol for Bluetooth is the Nordic runes for H and B combined.

The most photographed area is Nyhavn, or new harbor. The area was a red-light district for sailors. In an attempt to make the street more wholesome, the buildings were painted vibrant colors. That did not work. But allowing boats to dock there did.

Nyhavn (new harbor)
Nyhavn (new harbor)

We visited the royal palace, Amalienborg. Amalienborg is a set of mansions and was originally owned by noblemen, but after the Christiansborg Palace was damaged by fire, the royal family moved in. In contrast to other royal families, the Danish royal family is down-to-earth and tries to blend in. They are frequently seen walking their dogs.

Amalienborg
Amalienborg

At night, we watched the fireworks from the Tivoli Gardens amusement park.

My favorite thing to do was bike around on the public city bikes. They have an electric motor, and the rider can set the desired level of motorized assistance. There is a GPS tablet affixed to the front of the bike so that we knew where we were and could plan routes. We biked primarily east of the urban area, over bridges and cobblestones, admiring the architecture.

Bycyklen bikes
Bycyklen bikes

The city is beautiful, a mix of modern and historic. If Stockholm and Amsterdam had a child, Copenhagen would be the result.

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