Geocaching part 1

I recently started geocaching. The Seattle area has so many parks and trails, and geocaching is a good way of discovering them.

It was really easy to get started. There is a geocaching phone app that has a map of all the nearby caches and their recent activity (like if the cache was found recently and is in good condition). It was surprising that there are caches nearly everywhere, even in places I’ve been to many times before.

The first cache I found was at a bus stop. It took two search attempts. The first attempt, I went with my coworkers and we felt we combed the area, even checking under the trash bag and looking at the bus stop across the street. But we couldn’t find it. The problem was, we had no idea what we were looking for. We found the cache on our second attempt. It was a magnetic case, smaller than a fingertip. We were expecting something bigger.

Geocache under a bus stop bench
Geocache under a bus stop bench
Geocache under a bus stop bench
Geocache under a bus stop bench

I proudly signed my name on the log.

 

After the first find, it was easier to find other caches. The trick was to go to the exact coordinates and search for any loose object with no preconceived notion of what to look for. Geocaches can have tricky hiding places, like this one embedded in a gate.

The geocache was hidden in the gate
The geocache was hidden in the gate
Geocache on the 520 bike trail, Redmond
Geocache on the 520 bike trail, Redmond

This geocache was disguised as a rock. The rock was hollow and contained a logbook and trinkets.

Geocache disguised as a rock in Pioneer Park, Mercer Island
Geocache disguised as a rock in Pioneer Park, Mercer Island

Some caches are more obvious than others.

White bucket in Luther Burbank Park, Mercer Island
White bucket in Luther Burbank Park, Mercer Island

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